Manutius

This panel depicts the mark of Aldus Manutius.  Manutius is credited with being the most famous printer and publisher of Venice. He gave to the printing world two inventions, the letters of Italic type and the small format of books. Aldus Manutius was devoted to public service, providing for the masses a number of well-printed, handy volumes at affordable prices. After his death, his work was carried on by the Aldine family, which retained the central theme of his mark, though it would pass through a number of variations. The Aldine anchor was suggested to the elder Aldus by the design on an old Roman coin, said to have been that of the Emperor Augustus. The motto “Festina lente” meaning “Make haste slowly” was also on the coin. The dolphin in the mark symbolizes speed and activity while the anchor symbolizes stability and firmness.

 

The stained glass panel highlighted here once hung in the windows of Kent Library when it was originally installed in 1939. In 1968, the panes were placed into walnut frames and displayed on the mezzanine level of the renovated library until 2007 when they were removed for safety during library remodeling.

 

 

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